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BoatU.S study reveals reasons for lax PFD use

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Two hunter and angler focus groups commissioned by the BoatU.S. Foundation for Boating Safety & Clean Water have revealed the top-three reasons sportsmen don't wear life jackets while boating, according to a BoatU.S. release today.

Chris Edmonston, director of Boating Safety Programs at the BoatU.S. Foundation, said the No. 1 reason given for not wearing a life jacket was lack of comfort.

"Hunters and anglers believe that life jackets are too hot, too uncomfortable and too bulky,” Edmonston said. “What is surprising, however, is their low awareness of the new class of lightweight, comfortable inflatable life jackets that have been on the market for several years now. Unfortunately, many sportsmen still see life jackets as those boxy orange foam ones they wore as kids.”

The second most common reason for not wearing a jacket was that this group rarely sees professionals on television wearing their life jackets.    more...


 



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TowBoatU.S. opens ninth Lake Michigan port

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BoatU.S., which offers an on-the-water towing service for recreational boaters, has expanded its TowBoatU.S. operations on Lake Michigan with the addition of TowBoatU.S. Muskegon, Mich. to its fleet, the company said in a recent release.

Located on the Muskegon Channel adjacent to the U.S. Coast Guard Station Muskegon, the port is owned by Capt. Gregory Hibbard, a Muskegon native who recently returned to Michigan after working in Florida for 20 years. The new location is the ninth TowBoatU.S. port on Lake Michigan and the 36th TowBoatU.S. port servicing the Great Lakes.    more...


 



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Boat Smart: Advice from Jim Dreyer

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On July 4, 2003 seven people drowned in one afternoon near Warren Dunes State Park, Michigan. Great Lakes marathon swimmer Jim Dreyer reflects on the drownings while offering life-saving advice. But first let’s review the conditions that led up to the downings.

Mike Terrel, manager of Warren Dunes State park, estimated there were 20,000 park visitors that day and half appeared to be in the lake. “The drownings at the park occurred around 3:30 p.m.. Water conditions were such that we continued to fly the red warning flag and announce warnings over loud hailers every fifteen minutes,” said Terrel.   more...

Posted by atwos at August 3, 2004 11:39 AM



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Do Drink the Water

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But first, use one of these methods of purification.

About 10 years ago I was fishing on the west slope of the Rockies with a buddy of mine. The water was so clean you could smell the freshness.

In the heat of the day my friend took a long drink right from the stream. I warned him not to, but he ignored me. Later, in deference to our friendship, I said nothing as he spent a day and a night in the sweaty twists and turns of “beaver fever,” caused by the cysts of the protozoan Giardia, which can be found just about anywhere.

Water gets polluted by lots of things: chemicals, heavy metals, bacteria and viruses. Even crystalline brook water that looks as pure as the day the earth was formed might harbor the worst kinds of impurities. You can’t tell by looking, smelling or tasting. So you must purify every drop you drink.   more...

 



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  • The world is a man urinal. It's all the animals too!
    - [editor@h2onotes.com]

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Tossing Back a Few Beers on the Boat Not a Good Idea

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DAYTON, OH, July 07, 2004 - Two years ago on July 4, Dean Martin, of Charlotte, Vt., was skipper of a combination sailboat/motorboat when the watercraft capsized on Lake Champlain. All 11 people on board were tossed out. Only nine of them made it to safety. Two children, a brother and sister, were trapped under the boat and drowned. Martin was drunk.

An analysis of more than 32,000 information sources on LexisNexis® databases shows July is deemed by the U.S. Coast Guard to be the most dangerous boating month with an average of 157 deaths on waterways across the nation during the last 10 years. Many of those deaths are blamed on lack of safety training and victims not wearing life jackets. But, according to the Coast Guard, alcohol is a factor in an overwhelming majority of the deaths. As a result, all U.S. states and territories now have boating under the influence laws.   more..


 



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Coast Guard warns boaters after explosion, death

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In the wake of a fatal boat explosion Saturday that killed a man on Lake Macatawa, the Coast Guard is urging boaters to remember safety procedures.

Although investigators believe the victims followed all the safety checks, they remind boaters to inspect the boat's ventilation system before heading out on the water and to let the blower run before starting the motor.

It is a basic rule of thumb that Coast Guard Officer Jason Bernard has for those looking to enjoy West Michigan's summer.

"It might be something that people take for granted sometimes. It's dangerous not to take the time to check (the ventilation system)," he said. "You have to check, at least. If there is a fuel leak and you don't look, how are you going to know? At the very least, turn the blower on to get the vapors out."  more...

 



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Deadly Summer Fun

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orange smokeIt happens every summer — tragic deaths from drowning on the nation's lakes, rivers and oceans. But boating experts say some of these deaths may have actually been caused by an invisible hazard, carbon monoxide poisoning.

It's long been known that carbon monoxide from boat engines and generators can build up and prove deadly, inside a boat's cabin, but it is becoming clear that this hazard also exists outside the cabin, and people are dying after being exposed to carbon monoxide in the open air.

"We have death after death after death proving that this is occurring," said Dr. Robert Baron, an emergency room physician and the medical director of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which includes Lake Powell, where a number of these deaths have occurred.  more...

 



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Life jackets truly life savers

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Joan Allen is a 911 emergency-call taker for the Chicago Police Department. In the summer, the phone rings often with reports of distress on Lake Michigan and other bodies of water, so she knows better than most how playful afternoons in boats can turn dangerous.

"We get quite a few calls," Allen said. "Stranded boats. Sinking boats. Possibly someone in distress."

Allen reports the emergencies to the Fire Department or the Coast Guard and hopes for the best.

If there's one thing Allen has learned about boating safety without even venturing out on the water in her six years on the job, it is critical for those phoning for help to know the location of their boat or the boat they are calling about.   more...


 



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NEW SOSPenders World Class Manual Inflatable Life Jacket w/Harness,

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The next generation of sailing inflatable life jackets. The new Sospenders inflatable life vest is USCG approved and has all new comfort features for ultimate wearability.
The remarkable Sospenders story began with founder Scott Swanby vowing to improve life jacket wearability following the drowning death of a friend. The SOSPENDERS vision is simply this: To make the most comfortable life jacket in the world. Their philosophy is that if you have your jacket on it will SAVE YOUR LIFE. Try one on and feel the difference, knowing you are protected by some of the worlds toughest standards.  
more...

 

 



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Man overboard!

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 It's 12:30 AM and I can't seem to sleep. The events of yesterday's race keep playing through my mind, only these events aren't about how well we did in the race but the events leading up to, and after, we had a man in the water with a head injury. Not only did we have an unconscious man in the water, but he was also not wearing a life-preserver. He normally wore a life vest under his foul weather gear but this time he had a brand new harness-type self-inflating PFD in his bag below deck. My guess is that, with the change of routine, he forgot to put it on over his foul weather gear.    more...


 



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Lightning Kills, Play It Safe

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Summer is the peak season for one of the nation's deadliest weather phenomena— lightning. Safeguarding U.S. residents from dangerous lightning is the goal of this Website. The campaign is designed to lower lightning death and injury rates and America's vulnerability to one of nature's deadliest hazards.

In the United States, an average of 67 people are killed each year by lightning. In 2003, there were 44 deaths. That's more than the annual number of people killed by tornadoes or hurricanes.   more...

 



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Program fills swimming void

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Sally Klyn was relieved to sign her daughter up for swim lessons.

Klyn, of Ypsilanti, enrolled her daughter, Charlotte, in swim lessons with the city of Ypsilanti last year. But when the future of Rutherford Municipal Pool came into question, she began seeking other options.

Eastern Michigan University saw the pool's uncertainty as an opportunity to offer swim lessons to children ages 4 to 14 through its recreation and intramural department.

"I didn't want to spend too much time looking around, and I wanted to make sure she got in," Klyn said. "It looked like a good program through Eastern.   more...

 



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Marine officers mix fun, safety

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ImageWhen Jonah Oleksiak strapped on a life vest and hopped on board a Macomb County sheriff’s boat, the 8-year-old wasn’t just taking a fun ride. He was learning how to be safe.

“It was my first time on a boat,” said the fourth-grader from Roseville. “I had to remember to keep my hands off the boat, to stay sitting down while the boat was moving and to stay calm when the boat was going fast.”

Throughout the year, officers from the Marine Division of the Macomb County Sheriff’s Office teach a free Michigan Boating Basics course in more than 50 middle schools throughout the county.  more...

 



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Do You Have a Buddy?

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We have a buddy at our local marina named Buddy.  His real name isn't Buddy and, in actuality, Buddy could be several buddies, but to avoid incriminating any specific person (me included) let's just stick with our Buddy.  Buddy is a guy that is very friendly, quick with a warm greeting and a cold beer and is always eager to help a fellow boater.  Buddy is also a guy that many folks at the marina try and keep a little distance from for safety sake.   more...

 



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Some swimmers ignore danger

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cDunes-Swimmers.jpeg

The red flag was out, plainly visible in front of the three concession stands.

Despite 60-degree temps and windy conditions Saturday, at least several hundred people were on the beaches of Warren Dunes State Park.

All could plainly hear the announcement that was being made every 15 minutes.

"For your own safety, it is advised you stay out of the water until further notice" came the words from the loudspeaker. "Anyone entering the water does so at their own risk."   more...

 



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