home  :  get our free newsletter  :  past newsletters  :  become a sponsor  :  donate  :  contact us
community weblog  :  community calendar  :  discussions  :  login

community weblog - [ Sailing ]

Steady start for stand-in Maxi skipper

  #
Rolex Trophy
Sydney, AUS
December 10 - 18, 2005

Alfa Romeo showed a clean pair of heels to the fleet, winning both Division 0 races on the opening day of the Rolex Trophy Ratings Series on a beautiful sailing day in Sydney. Neville Crichton was unable to helm his boat today as he was confined to his sickbed after a bout of food poisoning, but British tactician Adrian Stead stepped up to the wheel and did an admirable stand-in job. Racing in light easterly breezes in a two-metre swell, the Reichel/Pugh canting-keeled Super Maxi led her near-sistership Wild Oats XI by over a minute at the first turning mark of the first race, She extended to a winning margin of 1 minute 29 seconds by the top of the second beat, where the race committee shortened the race.   more...

Photo credit: Carlo Borlenghi / Rolex



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

2005 Corum Melges 24 World Championship - Day Three - Tuesday, December 13th

  #

 

Photos by Thierry Martinez



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

ITALIANS AND NOT-SO-ITALIANS SHARE TOP SPOTS AT CORUM MELGES 24 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

  #

INTERNATIONAL MELGES 24 CLASS ASSOCIATION
PRESS RELEASE
December 14, 2005
Photos by
Thierry Martinez

article by Keith Taylor

KEY LARGO, Fla., Dec. 14, 2006 – Two Italian sailing teams are leading the 99-boat fleet after four intense days of racing in the 2005 Corum Melges 24 World Championship at Ocean Reef Club in Key Largo.

A mostly professional crew of international sailors led by Australian America's Cup skipper James Spithill has claimed the number one position with two days of competition remaining. A largely amateur crew, sailing together for the first time and led by pro skipper Gabriele Benussi, is clinging to second place overall, just one point off the pace.

Conditions inside the reef off the northern end of Key Largo were ideal with a sunny sky, and slight chop stirred by a brisk ten-knot easterly breeze

Spithill, who now steers the Italian America's Cup contender Luna Rossa for Genoa's Yacht Club d'Italiano, is sailing with American brothers Jonathan and Charlie McKee, from Seattle, Washington. Both McKees are double Olympic sailing medalists. A fourth crew member is Manuel Modena, a 49er sailor from Italy's Lake Garda. All four sailors are part of the Italian challenge and not surprisingly they have named their chartered boat Luna Rossa.

more

Sailing  



discussion

  discuss this article

2005 Corum Melges 24 World Championship

  #

2005 Corum Melges 24 World Championship
Ocean Reef Club Overall Results
Races 1 through 4 are Final. Races 5 and 6 are Preliminary

more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

The First Reach

  #

by
Brian Hancock        Photo by Jim Evans
article from http://www.sailjazz.com

Many sailors view the first reach of a triangle course as a time to relax and recover from the stress and effort of the start and windward leg. There are usually not many changes in positions and the sailing is relatively easy. They could not be more wrong. The first reach is a critical part of the race, when the fleet stretches out, the leaders move ahead, and the rest fall behind. If your strategy is to sail consistently throughout a regatta and to remain in touch with the front pack, you cannot afford to drop out of the game by relaxing. While passing boats on a reach is not easy, your goal should be to narrow the gap between yourself and the boats ahead, and extend the gap between you and the boats behind. It’s not as difficult as it sounds. Just as for the start and windward leg, you need a strategy for the first offwind leg. Many of the same factors that you looked for at the start of the race will apply. Is the wind oscillating or changing in strength? Is there current? What is the geometry of the course and how tightly packed is the fleet? All of these issues will come into play as soon as you round the windward mark.    more...



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

The 10 Keys for Consistent Results

  #

by Wally Cross

Sail boat racing can be very hard and with out systems and rules to race with the results will vary. I like to have ten keys or rules to remember every time I race so we can eliminate the bad races.

Rule One

  • CROSS WHEN YOU CAN

This is one rule I have to keep telling myself after the start, part way up the first leg, early on the leeward leg and through out the race. We all believe at times we know what the wind will do, yet the reality is we do not know for sure, yet have hunches on a possible shift. After being more wrong than right I decided to enforce this rule when ever possible.

Shortly after the start I will be constantly asking the crew on the rail if we can cross. Now if you start to windward and most of the fleet is to leeward in control this rule will not apply. Often we will start at least a third the way down the line and our total focus early is to sail the boat in a high, slow target to force the windward boat to tack early. Once it is possible to tack and cross a majority of the fleet, we tack.

more



Sailing  

discussion

  • Wally Really nice article on top tips to remember when it is to complex to thin...more
    - [charlie2]

  read more (1 total)

Sailing with Children: The First Day

  #

article by Michelle Potter

Teaching children to sail can be a dream come true. Literally handing the helm over to the next generation is the ultimate way to share your love of sailing. Here are a few tips to help children enjoy their first day on the water.

Anticipation  Building anticipation is your best course when introducing any new activity to children. Looking at pictures of boats with children, telling them funny stories about your early sailing adventures and discussing upcoming sailing trips gives children something to look forward to. This is good—who doesn't like something to anticipate? So, when you talk about sailing, build it up a little. You know that special tone of voice reserved for c-o-o-k-i-e-s? Start using it for s-a-i-l-i-n-g.

Safety should be part of any pre-sailing training. Children should know how to swim before stepping on a boat. If they are too young to swim, they should at least know how to float with their heads above water while wearing a personal flotation device with built-in collar. Find a pool where children can practice floating in their PFDs with the adults.   more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Boat Etiquette

  #

article by Mark Matthews

According to The Annapolis Book of Seamanship by John Rousmaniere, yachting is over 300 years old; older than baseball, tennis, golf, and almost every other outdoor sport. Tradition in the sport has evolved as part ceremony and part necessity. Boat etiquette has been developed not to one-up your neighbor with esoteric knowledge, but rather to establish a standard set of rules and boathandling skills that instill confidence in you and your fellow boaters. Your fellow boater is someone you may need to call on in times of grounding, docking, or any number of other reasons requiring aid. It is thus wise to establish a good rapport with him by abiding to existing customs and traditions. Privacy and mutual aid are the cornerstones of boat etiquette.

Wakes and Speed  The Rules of the Road dictate how to operate your vessel underway in order to prevent collision. However, even if no risk of collision exists, you are not free to do whatever you want when operating in the vicinity of other vessels. A thoughtless wake can do damage to docks and moored vessels. When overtaking a slower vessel in open water, do so with as much room as depth conditions allow and reduce your speed, if necessary, to avoid rocking the other vessel. There is nothing worse than being below in a slow trawler or sailboat, cooking breakfast, and being suddenly overtaken in close quarters by a wake-throwing, hurried boater.    more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

CW Announces BOTY 2006 Winners

  #

Newport, Rhode Island--Cruising World magazine has announced the best in boatbuilding for 2006 with its 12th annual Boat of the Year Awards. The results will be featured in Cruising World's January 2006 issue.  

    Cruising World continued with the tradition started in 2005 by choosing two overall winners – one domestic and one import. The title of Domestic Cruising Boat of the Year goes to the Morris 42; the Import Cruising Boat of the Year is the Hallberg-Rassy 62.

    "This year's final round of 26 nominees was exemplary, as strong an overall fleet as we've seen in the dozen years we've been conducting our annual contest," said Cruising World editor Herb McCormick. "And the overall winners, the Morris 42 and the Hallberg-Rassy 62, were magnificent boats in every respect, and truly deserving of the recognition."

    Of the 26 nominees, 20 were imports, with entries from Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, England, France, Germany, Slovenia, South Africa, and Sweden. This year also saw two new players: Delphia Yachts of Poland and Salona Yachts of Croatia.
more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

The Paris Boat Show: Introducing the Beneteau 10R

  #

Sailing World's Tony Bessinger attended the opening days of the Paris Boat Show to catch the introduction of the latest First series design from Beneteau.

By Tony Bessinger

The Paris Boat Show is one of three big shows held each year in France, and it's where buyers go to order a boat in time for delivery the next spring. In Europe, where it's known as the Salon Nautique de Paris it's a big deal. As a result, manufacturers go all out, especially Beneteau, which takes up a big chunk of floor space in the huge show with boats, offices, a Beneteau clothing boutique, and lounge areas. The big shots sit behind closed doors in back offices doing business with dealers, while sales personnel work the floor, answer questions, and write up orders for new boats at one of the many tables available for that reason. Hostesses serve tiny plastic cups of espresso, and while "no smoking" signs are all over the building, everybody's puffing away with abandon.   more...


 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Win-A-Coach 2006

  #

Apply via email to coach@sailingworld.com

To have a top-level coach join your crew on the water and consult before and after major regattas by e-mail, answer the questions below. Ten finalists will be chosen, and we'll publish excerpts of their plans when we announce the winners of two free coaching packages for 2006. (See p. 48 to read what the 2005 winner learned.) The first 10 entries, and the 10 finalists, will receive a free year's subscription to Sailflow.com's exclusive wind and weather content.

Send to coach@sailingworld.com your goals for 2006, your strengths, weaknesses, and how a coach can help you. Include name, address, phone, e-mail, boat name and type, racing experience, and best finishes in last three years. Deadline: Dec. 31, 2005.   more...


 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

The New J/124 Launches ... 41 Feet of Pure Sailing Joy

  #

Introduction

From its large carbon wheel to the fine teak joinerwork and Ultra-leather or suede upholstery below, or simply by the smooth, graceful way it slides through the water, the new J/124 is every bit a sailing yacht… in the best sense of the word. One that is a joy to sail in all conditions with minimal crew and with rare need to employ the auxiliary diesel engine.

Yet, J/124’s focus on short-handed sailing qualities doesn’t preclude many days of offshore coastal sailing. Her narrow beam and low center-of-gravity are hallmarks of seaworthiness.

J/124 is a true escape…away from all the trappings and chores of home. Little-used amenities and complex cruising systems are discouraged where possible. But, all the important stuff is there: An adequate galley and chart table; the accessible top-loading icebox; 6 feet of headroom; three separate sleeping areas; a dodger for all-weather protection; and a cockpit made secure with 14” high backrests and seats that are long enough to sleep on.  more...

 



Boat Reviews  Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

2004 International DN Ice Sailing World Championship

  #


2004 International DN Ice Sailing World Championship
January 18-25, Lake Balaton, Hungary
Photos by
Carlo Borlenghi.



Sailing  SNOW  

discussion

  discuss this article

Sydney to Hobart plodders take the long way home via the Falklands

  #
By Alan Kennedy  http://www.smh.com.au/

The veteran yachtsmen Alex Whitworth and Peter Crozier like a challenge. In 1998, sailing Berrimilla, one of the smallest boats in the Sydney to Hobart fleet, they took on the savage storm that hit the race, leaving six dead and several boats sunk. They made it to the finish line, winning their division.

This year they have decided to go one better.

Whitworth and Crozier will race to Hobart and, after dismissing the rest of their crew, will take the long way home via Cape Horn, the Falklands and England. They will sail in the Fastnet race and return to Australia around the Cape of Good Hope.

If all goes according to plan, and they are the first to admit they are sailing into uncharted waters, they will be back in Sydney in time for next year's race south.

Whitworth, 62, a sailing instructor, and Crozier, 59, a builder, have been talking about the trip for years.   more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Volvo Ocean Race: Pirates of the Caribbean back in the water

  #

Sacha Oswald: http://www.bymnews.com


The Pirates of the Caribbean were back on the water and sailing today for the first time since withdrawing from the opening leg of the race.

After suffering a leak through the keel fairing doors on the first night of racing The Black Pearl was forced to pull out of the opening leg and seek urgent repairs in Cascais, Portugal.

But a month on, fully repaired and looking like new, The Black Pearl returned to the water for a practice sail this afternoon and skipper Paul Cayard was happy to report the problems which wrecked their first leg are now cured.

“The boat feels no different. It shouldn’t feel different. From a performance viewpoint, nothing has changed. We just repaired some things that were broken,” said the American winner of the 1998 Whitbread Race.   more...


 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Prev 101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  [109]  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  Next

You are on page 109
A total of 393 pages are available.

Items 1621-1635 of 5889.

Pages: [1 - 25] [26 - 50] [51 - 75] [76 - 100] [101 - 125] [126 - 150] [151 - 175] [176 - 200] [201 - 225] [226 - 250] [251 - 275] [276 - 300] [301 - 325] [326 - 350] [351 - 375] [376 - 393]


<<  |  November 2019  |  >>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
272829303112
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
1234567

view our rss feed



Copyright 2019 Edict Incorporated
280 Mill Street, Suite A | Rochester, MI 48307 | (248) 650-4962
privacy statement | contact us