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GLYC Fall Series - Race 2

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The results are in for the October 9, 2005-Race 2 of the GLYC Fall Series.  Attached is a picture of Black Ice (GLYC) and Clifford BRD (NSSC) ready to round the windward mark.  It was a brisk, really clear fall day with winds in the 15-20 range, so different than Race 1 last week where winds were light and the air was warm..  See the results of this race, series standing and more pictures at http://www.greatlakesyc.org/racing.html.  Photo by Tom Verbeke.

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2005 Corum Melges 24 World Championship

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Just because summer has officially retired (or at least for the moment) doesn't mean a thing! Right now, there are more Melges 24 teams traveling to more events than ever before. For most it's a build-up/warm-up to the 2005 Corum Melges 24 World Championship in Key Largo at Ocean Reef, however some of the preceeding events are simply first class, absolutely amazing venues and boast an array of the most incredible hospitality, superior race organizations and clubs - in particular WFORC.

The Pensacola Yacht Club in Pensacola, Florida plays host to the 2005 WFORC (West Florida Ocean Racing Circuit) on October 15-16. If you have never been to PYC, now's your chance to get a first hand look at how the best-of-the-best do it! The Pensacola Yacht Club has been hosting this event for thirty-one years and has been nothing less than incredible to the Melges 24 class. In 2001, they hosted the National Championship and are currently looking ahead to potentially hosting many more national and international Melges 24 regattas.

The Melges 24 fleet is expected to be in the 20+ boat range. Crews from all over the Southeast, Northeast and as far as the West Coast are out in full force ready for action as they travel east headed for the King's Day Regatta/Atlantic Coast Championship on November 18-20 in Jacksonville, then on to Key Largo for the Worlds. Past USMCA Southeast District Governor, Doug Kessler anticipates an awesome regatta with a lot of great racing, friends and fun parties. LeAnne Pickering, is planning a Melges 24 party in celebration of just that.

PYC has scheduled registration to begin on Thursday, October 13, then two full days of racing - Saturday and Sunday both followed by BBQ, seafood buffets, music and best of all, Mount Gay Rum will be free flowing!!! Each day a light breakfast will be offered as well as lunches for everyone.

So, if you are on the fence about this one - get off and head to Pensacola for the weekend! Check-in and late registration doesn't close until Friday, October 14 for the M24s so, what are you waiting for? Get ready to have a great time and a lot of fun sailing your Melges 24 against some of the most competitive teams in the country.

For more information about this regatta, contact
Doug Kessler on email or visit www.pensacolayachtclub.org where a complete entry pack is available online - NOR, Entry Forms and Schedule of events!


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2005 Gold Cup Lake Geneva WI - Recap

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Tight Racing on Final Day of Gold Cup --

Day three of the 2006 Melges 24 Gold Cup dawned easterly breezes at 12-14 mph and some of the tightest racing of the regatta. Brian Porter entered day three with a 6 point lead over Jeff Ecklund and Vince Brun, but that all would change with a seventh race and the addition of a throwout. After doing the math, it came down to Porter, Ecklund and Brun as the only boats who could win the regatta and a who beat who in the race to decide who would be the 2006 Gold Cup champion.

Lake Geneva is the perfect setting for the final day of a regatta with the with everything on the line as a boat is truly never out of a race with the big shifts making their way down the lake. After a heavily port favored starting line, Porter, Brun and Ecklund all got of the line with clean lanes and good position. Brun and Ecklund broke to the right side while Porter was forced to work the left side due to starboard tackers on his hip. As the beat progressed, all three regatta leaders began to extend and work their respective areas of the course; Porter on the left, Ecklund through the middle and Brun on the right. The first beat looked like that of a heavy weight boxing match with the left looking great at times, then fading only to see the right looking great than fading back to the left again. As the three boats approached the top mark the last shift turned out to be a nice port which allowed Porter and his crew aboard Full Throttle to round in first. Ecklund rounded a close second after getting to the left to take part in the final shift, and Brun struggled from the right to round the top mark in fifth position. With a winner take all race, boat handling and boat position would prove to be a crucial factor.   more...

 



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Rough Seas and Big Lessons

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A story of a life changing event on a small sailboat in rough seas
By Rob Nelson

medium_boat-with-wave2.jpg



I lay down now, in a soft bed, on dry ground, in the back of a valley in Hawai'i. Its been a long day … a day that keeps replaying over and over again in my head. I want to share my story with others, as a testament of the sea’s power, a power so strong as to change my view of the sea and of life. Here’s what I remember, before the details fade from my memory.

November 28, 2003:

I board the boat with a beautiful girl named Naomi. The wind is completely dead and I have to use the motor to bring the boat to its anchor in the bay where we will camp out for the night. After anchoring we sat on the deck and admired the stars, smoething I'd done maybe a hundred times since July. We sat looking out at the glory of the ocean, reminiscing on times we’d had at sea – the magical ones, and the frightening ones. As we slept, there were times when the wind and rain picked up, but by morning things were fairly mellow again. There remained only a nice moderate wind for sailing.    more...


 



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A Reader Responds...

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Matt Ciesicki,
I wish to tell you that your write up of this article "Heavy Air Gybing
-Timing and Teamwork" is absolutely the best I have ever read on the subject.  
 
With my 67 years and starting on penquins when I was 7 thru college sailing club on Highlanders on Lake Cowan SW Ohio, thru Lightening, and Star Classes thru the J Class I have never read anything that puts you right on deck as well as this article.
Thanks so much Matt.  It reminds me of Bruce Catton's descriptions
of the battles of the Civil War. (You can smell the heat, burning flesh, horses, cannon, cries and death.  )  Matt, I would put you in a class with Catton.  I can feel the wind, the salt air, and the calling of the helmsman.    THANKS SO MUCH FOR A GREAT ARTICLE AND KEEP THEM COMING.   James C. Landon III  Bellevue,Kentucky

 http://www.wcsailing.com/index2.asp?NGuid=50B4F9D7AB81409BA0B4A50CEBE719B8

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Changing Headsails

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The call of “change the headsail “has resonated with teams since the inception of competitive sailing. It is one of the ultimate calls to action for a team as the crew hurriedly goes about their tasks, very often under the pressure of time, tactical needs and weather concerns.

 

I recently had the pleasure of sailing with S20 veterans Tim Dunton and Guy Lindsey at Dillon YC’s excellent Dillon Open regatta in Colorado on Tim’s S20 “Chubasco”.

It was another normal pre start of a race – the routine lay line checks to the starting line, head to wind readings and pre start maneuvering. We were the first class to start.

 

At about roughly 4 minutes and 30 seconds to go – Tim eyed a wall of new wind approaching from the top of the lake and made the decision of the day, of the regatta – change to the Jib! This proved to be a race and regatta winning decision.

Guy and I looked at each other for a second and as he was scrambling forward to lower the Genoa I started to pull the jib out from down below. As I brought the jib on deck it started to blow 25 to 30 knots and the lake was white capping all around us.

As Guy changed the Genoa he reminded me of our own Bow person on “Disaster Area” – Bill Ramacciotti  - confident, quick and getting the job done – plain & simple.   more...

 

 



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Spinnaker Pole Height For Good Downwind Speed

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One of the many aspects of good downwind speed is attaining the correct height for the spinnaker pole in the wide variety of wind and sea conditions that your team can encounter over the course of a race or series.

In my role as a coach I spend quite a lot of time watching teams sail from out side of the boat; Very often I am video taping them or taking pictures for later  review and critique.  This perspective is a unique one and has helped with a lot of the sail shape visualizations that are more difficult to see when actually on board.

Every photograph of a boat with a spinnaker up reveals something about pole height and the shape of the sail. A casual flip through a sailing magazine can illustrate all the differences and pluses and minuses of spinnaker shapes.

Let’s look at the different conditions that your team will encounter and what to look for with pole height and the overall spinnaker shape that it creates.   more...

 



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J/105 Tuning Guide - Downwind Sailing Tips

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The J/105 has a relatively small asymmetric spinnaker set on a centerline sprit. The goal in downwind sailing is to maximize downwind VMG. This is achieved by sailing a wind angle tight enough to keep speed, but sailing lower towards the mark whenever possible. The North Sails asymmetric has been designed as a running spinnaker for optimum downwind performance at the apparent wind angles that produce the best VMG for the J/105. The sail has been designed to rotate out to windward to project the maximum sail area out from behind the mainsail. Always hoist the sail all the way to the top. Due to the luff length restriction in the rules, the tack of the sail is never set all the way down to the pole. Raising the tack helps the sail to rotate to windward.   more...


 



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Back at the Helm

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It was with a great deal of pleasure that we welcomed Gary Jobson’s visit to Seattle to speak at the Boat’s Afloat Show. Of course we wanted to hear what this sailing icon had to say about the sailing world and view the wonderful images he captures in his sailing shows and movies, but even more we wanted to express our joy at his being back in action following his bout with cancer. It’s an ongoing battle which he winning with his verve, focus, modern medicine, and the support of thousands of sailing friends world-wide.
      Gary received over 3000 emails when the sailing community learned of his condition shortly after the last America’s Cup. Now, two years after the stem cell transplant, he conservatively describes his condition as “well”. He tires more easily but still manages to do things like climb the mainmast on a square-rigger in the middle of the Atlantic, do a film in the British Virgin Islands, cruise his Sabre 402, race his Etchells and produce a new book. Amazing what a “nice nap” can do.    more...


 



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JOE FLY, Giovanni Maspero, Farr 40

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Porto Cervo, Italy 16 09 2005 ROLEX SETTIMANA DELLE BOCCHE 2005
JOE FLY Rolex2005©/ Photo: Carlo Borlenghi

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Heavy Air Gybing – Timing and Teamwork

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by Matt Ciesicki...      Photo credit: Daniel Forster / Rolex

Matt Ciesicki is a six year team member of Farr 40 "Samba Pa Ti", where they have recorded 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place World championship finishes, and multiple wins in SORC, Big Boat Series, National and North American regattas. Matt has supplied us with these trimming tips for improving your spinnaker trim ...

Timing and Teamwork are the keys to successful heavy air gybes in the Farr 40. Here are a few things to help perfect your heavy air gibing technique in winds from 9 – 12 m/s (18 – 24 knots) in strength:

Think ahead, so that there is plenty of time to communicate the maneuver to everyone and for everyone to understand what is going to happen. There should never be an instance of ‘we HAVE to gybe now’ – it should happen slowly and under control.

There are four principle reasons why boats wipe out in this condition: the boat was not at full speed when the gybe started, the main trimmer did not get the main over properly, the helmsman did not turn smoothly, or the spinnaker trimmer did not have the kite trimmed correctly.

1) THE BOAT IS AT MAX SPEED. It is important that the boat is accelerating down a wave when the gybe commences – this will reduce the apparent wind to the absolute minimum, which reduces the loads on the spinnaker and main sheets, as well as reduces load on the helm.

Wait for a good wave – some waves are moving the wrong way or are too short, or there isn’t enough wind to ride it properly. If the boat slows down too much – STOP THE GYBE – wait for the next good wave, and gybe when the boat is up to speed. If you were thinking ahead, you should have plenty of room to allow for this.

If the spinnaker should collapse right before the gybe, again – WAIT – refill the spinnaker and get back to speed, catch a wave and then gybe. If the spinnaker is not full, the boat will need to turn too far to get the main over. The chances of a wrap in the spinnaker are very high.

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US SAILING ANNOUNCES LOCATION FOR U.S. OLYMPIC AND PARALYMPIC TEAM TRIALS

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Portsmouth, R.I. (October 4, 2005) - US SAILING, national governing body for the sport, announced today that the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Sailing Team Trials for the 2008 Olympic and Paralympic Games will be held in October 2007 in two parts of the country: Southern California and Rhode Island.

The decision on the location was made after several months of carefully evaluating all the aspects that needed to be taken into consideration. "We wanted to make sure we could offer all of the athletes an opportunity to compete in great sailing conditions and there are several of those around the country," said Dean Brenner, Chairman of US SAILING's Olympic Sailing Committee. "In the end, we needed to go with what we felt was best for the sailors. We are confident that this decision will help us produce the strongest U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Sailing Teams. These organizations will be great partners and we are looking forward to a great event."   more...


 



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USA. US SAILING & Harken announce strategic partnership

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Harken Official Hardware Supplier and Sponsor to US Sailing Team

US SAILING and Harken Yacht Equipment has announced a five-year strategic partnership naming Harken as the “Official Hardware Supplier” and sponsor to the US Sailing Team. The US Sailing Team is working with its family of sponsors to act on a newly developed 20-year strategy to make dramatic increases in the support available to American sailors who are training to represent the United States in the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

“Harken is pleased to announce our partnership with the US Sailing Team—we are particularly excited about the prospect of playing an active roll in their new strategy that has been articulated so clearly about the team’s future,” explains Harken’s Vice President Olaf Harken.   more...


 



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Indiana Sailing Association, Inc.

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INDIANA SAILING ASSOCIATION, INC.

HISTORY

Established in 1989.

Sponsors Cardinal Sailors at East Chicago Central High School.

Recruits intramural sailors from Purdue University Calumet.

Only sail training program operating on Lake Michigan solely for young people.

Works closely with or follows guidelines of the U.S. Coast Guard, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, International Yachting Association and governing maritime authorities.

Web site: www.indianasailing.org

Nonprofit organization.

MISSION: Aims of Indiana Sailing Association, Inc. are to provide facilities for sailboat sailing in the Great Lakes and for seamanship and navigation generally; to improve the conditions of life for young people by giving them the opportunity to go to sea offshore, working a vessel under sail with their own hands; to foster the spirit of adventure latent in youth people; to build a sense of responsibility among young people both for themselves and for the community in which they live and to broaden horizons for learning, further education and marine industry careers.   more...



 



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The Detroit Model Yacht Club

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If you are interested in radio/controlled model sailboats, this is the place to visit. This website will tell you when and where we sail. Look in the Special Events and Calendar section for sailing information. The Links Section will give you more information about sailing in general and sailing model sailboats. We sail four different models locally, the Victoria, US1M, Marblehead and AC’s. Information about the four different classes of model sailboats can be found by clicking on each class, left side of this page.

We currently race on Mondays and Thursdays, starting in April and running into October. Wednesdays are set-up for afternoon sailing for those that want a more laid-back kind of activity. Rules, tactics, strategy, tuning, construction and rigging are regularly discussed.    more...

 



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