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VINCENT WINNER OF VENDEE GLOBE 2004

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It was at 22 hours 49 minutes and 55 seconds GMT this Wednesday 2 February 2005 that the 60 foot monohull PRB skippered by Vincent Riou crossed the finish line of the Vendée Globe 2004, the single-handed round the world race, without stopovers and without assistance at the start of Les Sables d’Olonne (France).
 
It was at 22 hours 49 minutes and 55 seconds GMT this Wednesday 2 February 2005 that the 60 foot monohull PRB skippered by Vincent Riou crossed the finish line of the Vendée Globe 2004, the single-handed round the world race, without stopovers and without assistance at the start of Les Sables d’Olonne (France). The race time after covering the 23680 miles is 87 days 10 hours 47 minutes and 55 seconds at an average theoretical speed along the course of 11.28 knots (22 km/hr). He thus succeeds Michel Desjoyeaux (PRB) who won the 2000/01 version of the race, having covered the 40000 kilometres of the course in 93 days 03 hours 57 minutes and 32 seconds.   more...
 


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New! Interphase PC/View with Interphase Software

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New! Interphase PC/View with Interphase Software (to convert PC into full VGA Scanning Sonar), Acoustic Interface (connects to PC's parallel port and scanning transducer) and the same transducers as the Twinscope, turns your personal computer laptop or desktop (not included) into forward scanning sonar

Introducing the all-new Interphase PC/View. Now you can turn your shipboard laptop or desktop PC into a powerful, high-resolution forward scanning sonar. Using your PC's computing power and its high resolution color display, the PC/View provides advanced sonar features for improved underwater navigation and detection. Incorporating the same patented technology as the Interphase Probe and Sea Scout, the PC/View can scan a moving beam from side to side to help locate suspended objects, schools of bait and fish, or can be set to scan vertically from the surface to the bottom to show obstacles, underwater structure and changing bottom conditions ahead. The PC/View can also work as a high-powered conventional color depth sounder and will easily operate on the same computer with most popular marine programs including your favorite chart plotting software.    more...

 



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The Joy of Sailing

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SailDRYA
The Joy of Sailing
Seminars developed with novice and recreational sailors in mind

"If it’s Wednesday night it’s Sailing Seminar night!"


February 2, 2004   7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Sponsored by the Grosse Pointe Sail Club

First Aid Afloat

Back by popular demand, Dr. Rob Amsler will educate us on how to treat those minor, and not so minor, sailing injuries. Learn what first aid items should be in your kit and how to properly administer them.

Location: The Tompkins Center, Grosse Pointe Windmill Park. Sponsored by the Grosse Pointe Sail Club. Phone: (313) 823-1063   more...

 



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Refitting for Performance, Part III

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Hanging around boat yards can be an experience. There is camaraderie among people working on their boats. And poking around other people’s projects can be informative too. Take for example Pete Sappett. As we worked on Mark McGivney’s C&C 25, Pete would stop by and check our progress. He would watch us make mistakes on the bottom, until we figured out the best techniques. Then he used this method to work on his bottom. We saved him hours! He would also fill us in on how he was getting his Morgan 32 into shape. From Pete, I learned a great trick for removing an old head. He waited until the coldest week of the winter. When the temperature was well below freezing he went to the boat to remove all the old parts. Why did he choose the coldest time of the year to do this? Simple. By doing it in freezing temperatures, anything left "lingering" in the plumbing would be frozen solid, avoiding a real mess. That’s one for the I-hope-I-never have-to-do-that file.   more...

 



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Refitting for Performance—Part II

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The weather this morning looked as though spring might finally have beaten back the harsh New England winter. A sunny sky, and bearable temperatures might even make believers of the most cynical residents of this region. Could the warm breezes of summer be just around the corner? Well, typical of this time of year, visions of shorts and miniskirts were soon muted by the formation of thick clouds approaching from the west. The warm breeze turned raw, the sun disappeared behind a blanket of gray and then that that raw, bone-chilling drizzle that has been an all too familiar this winter re-emerged. There is even talk of freezing rain and snow in the forecast. UGH! This winter has been like a relative who stays too long.   more...

 



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Refitting for Performance

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Believe me when I tell you that owning an older sailboat is a curse and a joy. It’s a curse because older boats always have something that needs to be done to fix or upgrade them. It’s a joy because older boats always have something that you can work on and upgrade. My friend Mark McGivney is realizing this firsthand, as the new owner of an old boat. Last year he purchased a 1978 C&C 25. I remember talking to him about this early on. As I recall he was excited to buy this boat, because "nothing had to be done to it." All it needed was a little bottom paint, and off he would go to explore Rhode Island from a new vantage point. I could only laugh to myself.   more...

 

 

 



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High and Dry Ice Boating

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From the Blade Runner Newsletter
Winter 2003


One of the most powerful forces of nature, ranking right up there with gravity, atom splitting, and the unknown powers that always make a buttered piece of bread fall buttered side down on a floor, is the force of attraction between an ice boat and open water.

Though I hesitate to use the term "global warming", it can not be argued that we are definitely experienced a warming trend the past several years. This in turn means that our sport has suffered in its search for sailable ice. The 4LIYC always tries to pick out safe ice on which to conduct our racing activities, but lately it seems that in order to get any sailing in we must contend with thin ice and/or areas of open water on the lake.

This requires increased awareness on everyone’s part. Not only is sailing into open water dangerous, the publicity and the involvement of police or fire rescue units, (whether warranted or not), is not good for our sport.   more...

 



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What's New On iceboat.org:

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February 2, 2005:
Kites On Ice at Memorial Union, Feb. 5-6
If there is no ice boating this weekend, make plans to attend one of America's premiere kite festivals, founded by Kite Aerial Photographer Craig Wilson, at the UW Memorial Union. Kites On Ice website.

Forecast is Looking Favorable
Geoff Sobering notes that WKOW-TV's forecast summary reads "With recent lows in the 30s, and highs in the days ahead soaring into the 40s, we're starting to see some rapid melting of the snow and ice covering Southern Wisconsin."

Byron Tetzlaff reports on Boat Night at the Nordhaus Shop.   more...

Photos ©Craig Wilson

http://www.madisonfestivals.com/kites/index.php

 

 

 



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The Love of Landfalls

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For many years I have made landfalls for a living, and I confess it isn’t a bad gig. As a professional sailboat skipper I have delivered hundreds of boats to far-flung quaysides. And while swift sloops, plodding cutters, stout ketches, graceful yawls, and reluctant schooners all run together in my brain like characters in a Garcia Marquez novel—one facet of every voyage remains crystal clear—all the landfalls I’ve made, the good, the bad and, the ugly. For some reason, I never forget a landfall. 

There are few events filled with as much promise as the prospect of making landfall after a long voyage. Of course long is relative and can be defined many ways. Long for me was the 72 days it took to con my diminutive Contessa 32 from Valparaiso, Chile north to the Golden Gate. We were down to the last few cans of provisions, canned asparagus at that, and fairly serious water rationing. It was time to make landfall. Long, however, for a former student of mine, was an eight-hour transit of the Gulf Stream. He whooped and hollered like old Chris Columbus when the spindly tower on South Bimini hove into view, swearing he’d never go to sea again and offering to buy the crew drinks at the Complete Angler once we made it ashore.  more...

 



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Dinghies for Cruisers

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Our friends were eight months into their encore cruise.

"It’s not how it used to be," the patriarch was saying.

The "used to be" in this case was 20 years earlier.

As he spoke I gazed at the blue light of television screens flickering from the portlights of the boats anchored around us.

"Boats are bigger," I offered. "Cruisers are bringing more of their shore life along with them. Floating suburbs."

"It’s not that," he said. "It’s the dinghies. When we cruised before, lots of sailors rowed to shore. If you are out in the cockpit when someone comes rowing by, you can’t help but exchange greetings. Even when they come putting by, you have the opportunity to speak. That’s exactly how we first met almost all of our cruising friends. But now it’s all RIBs with big motors. Zoom, they’re gone. Zoom, they’re back. If you’re quick, you can toss off an encouraging wave. That’s about it."   more...

 



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MELGES 24 TEAMS ARE THE LARGEST FLEET AT ST. PETERSBURG NOOD

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29 JANUARY 2005 • The US Melges 24 Fleet is on a participation rampage early in the racing season topping the number of entries with thirty teams (as of January 28) for the Lands End St. Petersburg NOOD.

In Key West, the M24 fleet was the largest in attendance with 59 entries. In St. Petersburg, the next largest fleet down is only seventeen. Size does matter! Entries include Ray Laguna "USA-552 Mr Hyde", Doug Kessler "USA-489 Liberty", newly elected USMCA Secretary/Treasurer Travis Weisleder "USA-602 Carloan.com" and Tony Trajkovich "USA-545 Bada Bing".

As always, the Sailing World NOOD Regatta Organization is lining up a great regatta and welcomes everyone to participate. All Regatta festivities are hosted at the legendary and very historic St. Petersburg Yacht Club.   more...

St Pete List of Entries as of 1/31  (12/28/2004)  List of entries as of 1/31/05.


 



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Interview with New Team Zenda Member Sam Rogers

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Interview by Eric Hood...

EH:
Welcome to Team Melges and North Sails Zenda. I know everyone in Zenda is thrilled that you are on the team. Can you fill all of our customers and friends in on what brought you to Zenda. Also, give us a little history on your high school and college sailing careers?

SR:
Growing up sailing scows, you can't help but be enamored with the legacy that Melges Boat Works has had not only in the ILYA, but in yacht racing throughout the whole world. To be a part of a company that is so successful and highly respected amongst sailors is really an honor. After sailing at a high level and working hard for 4 years at college, working for Melges seemed to be the next logical step in pursuing my goal of working in the sailing industry. I am very excited to be in Zenda and I can't wait for the summer to roll around.   more...

 

 

 



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Interview With Melges 32 2005 Key West Champion Jeff Ecklund

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Interview by Eric Hood...

EH
Jeff congratulations on the big victory this past week at Key West Race Week. Fill us in on how the project all came together.
JE
As you know, Harry and I have been sailing together for a number of years on the Melges24, E-Scow, A-Scow and other North Sails and Melges Performance Sailboat customer projects. When Harry called and asked if I would consider keeping my brand new Melges24 USA-595 "STAR" on the trailer for KWRW and drive the new Melges32, I jumped at the opportunity!

EH
We know you grew up sailing scows . Looks like you had a bunch of scow sailors out there sailing with you this past week. Fill us in on your crew and give us a report card on how they did.
JE
Yes, growing up sailing Scows on Lake Minnetonka, MN helped prepare me and my other Scow sailing crew for the speed and apparent wind adjustments needed to sail the Melges32 and the Melges24 for that matter at max-speed. Not only was Harry Melges on board but, Hans Melges, Judd Hirschberg and Sam Rogers...all with extensive fresh water Scow miles under their belts and did a great job keeping me on my game and the boat going fast at all times. Other dinghy sailors on board were Ernesto Rodriguez from Fort Lauderdale via Cuba and current Snipe National Champion.   more...

 



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Wally Cross Newsletter

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return to the home pageSailing Education at it's best!

Come to www.wcsailing.com  to get all the information you
need to get your boat sailing better and faster.

Crew performance, sail trim, boat preparation, strategy sessions and much more to teach your crew how to be a winning and better prepared competitor.

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Bay City to host national sailing convention

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The Bay City Doubletree's nautical-themed decor will come in handy later this year when the hotel and conference center will host the American Sail Training Association's annual convention.

"The opportunity to host the ASTA annual convention in Bay City is an incredible opportunity for our community," said Shirley Roberts, executive director of the Bay Area Convention & Visitors Bureau.

"It certainly puts us in very good company with communities like Newport, R.I., Boston, Los Angeles, Chicago and even Toronto and Vancouver, British Columbia," cities that previously have hosted the convention, Roberts said.

About 200-250 people are expected to attend the conference, scheduled for Nov. 3 and 4. But attendees likely will begin arriving Nov. 2 and some will stay for a ship safety program on Nov. 5, Roberts said.    more...

 



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