home  :  get our free newsletter  :  past newsletters  :  become a sponsor  :  donate  :  contact us
community weblog  :  community calendar  :  discussions  :  login

community weblog - [ Sailing ]

Cruising At Last: Sailing the East Coast

  #

 

"A wonderful old-fashioned coastal cruising book. No great storms here, just a passionate, articulate, wry sailor in a small boat, demonstrating the transforming art of living aboard a boat and visiting interesting places."
more...

 



Amazon  Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Berserk : My Voyage to the Antarctic in a Twenty-Seven-Foot Sailboat

  #

"The single word 'powerful' seems like the most appropriate way to describe Mercy's new sailing-adventure book. The title tells you what the book is all about, but it can not possibly convey the excitement or the gripping drama of this true story. It's a fascinating tale told by a gifted taleteller. This book is definitely not about sailboat racing, but anyone who has ever sailed - and those who have not - will become quickly immersed in this fast paced adventure story. "
more...

 

 

 



Amazon  Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Tartan 37

  #

The Tantalizing Tartan 37

Anyone viewing the pleasingly modern lines of a Tartan 37 would find it hard to believe the first production model hit the market in 1976. Remarkably, Charlie Britton, along with a very talented Sparkman & Stephens design team, effectively incorporated many features important to offshore cruising and racing in a 37-foot hull. The only thing that hints at her age is the trademark plaid-upholstered interior.

Sailing performance and quality construction in an aesthetically pleasing package have been keys to Tartan’s success as a builder. The 37 has been the most popular choice for a variety of practical reasons.

The hull is hand-laid and molded as a single unit. It is cored with end-grain balsa, tapered to solid glass in any high-stress areas (engine bed, mast step, shroud terminals, thru-hulls and keel sections). The deck is of the same construction with excellent molded-in non-skid on all flat surfaces; it is joined to the hull with a bedded, mechanically fastened lap joint that has proven to be strong and dry.   more...

 



Boat Reviews  Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Valiant 39

  #

After sailing aboard one in Annapolis, Maryland, on a sparkling morning last fall, Bill Lee labeled it a "bulletproof cruiser’s delight." Circumnavigator Mark Schrader called it a "bombproof boat built to take someone out to sea and bring him back intact." Strong sentiments, indeed, for a very capable sailboat. They were talking about the Valiant 39.

It shouldn’t be too much of a surprise to hear someone hail a Valiant as seaworthy. Designer Robert Perry’s canoe-stern staple has become a blue-water icon of sorts for long-distance sailors, from a generation of singlehanded around-the-world racers to oceangoing cruising families with a yen for far horizons.  more...

 



Boat Reviews  Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

INTERVIEW: Lowell North

  #

from Sailing World, June 1997

Innovations require imagination and a productive test method...

You’ve been called one of the most successful sailing scientists. Do you think that term fits?

I’d say no, because I’m not a scientist at all. I’m an engineer and there’s a pretty good difference. I like to do things, not study. I like to experiment, sometimes "outside of the box," as they would say.

But aren’t you known for your fanatical attention to detail?

I guess so, but that’s the engineer in me. I always figured I had to be faster, because I sure wasn’t any smarter. So I just worked harder at it. At the ’68 Olympics in Acapulco, for instance, we got down really early. Then we went out every day and just sailed with John Marshall -- our tuning partner. Everybody else stayed ashore and worked on their boats, like you do before regattas, and we were the only ones that practiced.   more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

INTERVIEW: Buddy Melges

  #

from Sailing World, June 1997

Changes in the rules have made the game more tactical...

When Sailing World first appeared in 1962 as One Design Yachtsman, you had just won three Mallory Cups. What were tactics like in those days?

Boatspeed was always a critical part of tactics. If you had the speed, you didn’t have to worry too much about the other boats. You just sort of started, got out in front and then let the people behind pick the course you wanted to sail. In my early days it was boatspeed, boatspeed, boatspeed. And my father always said, "Stay out of trouble." He hammered that into me.

Were people as aggressive 35 years ago as they are now?

No, definitely not. When you had a close crossing with someone, you never hunted them like you can now. That wasn’t considered polite. If you did it, when you got back to the dock you were considered a "bad guy."   more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

You Will Always Improve If You Learn To Coach Yourself

  #
Wouldn’t it be great to have a coach watch every move you make, in every race? Unfortunately, if you think of a "coach" as an outside observer, this is expensive or impractical. There is only one person in the world who can always be there to help you improve your sailing: you.

Self-coaching can be learned and improved like any other skill. I have found that there are four major aspects: 1. The ability to recognize weaknesses, 2. The ability to identify the cause and design ways to address those weaknesses, 3. The ability to efficiently manage time on the water for maximum productivity in practice, 4. The ability to recall practices and races to examine what went right and wrong.  more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Help Your Aching Back by Straightening Your Sailor’s Slouch

  #
by Theresa Colantuono

On a race day, as soon as you roll out of bed in the morning, you begin preparing to sail. You think about your gear, you think about your boat, but you probably don’t think about your body much until after racing when you come off the water saying, "My back is killing me."

You can injure your back sailing in several ways. The racing may be vigorous, where you’re hiking and trimming hard. It may be light and slow, where you’re sitting still in one position for hours. Sometimes, you may notice a pull that tells you exactly how and when you hurt yourself. But more often you won’t know how you injured your back.    more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Ready, Aim, Shoot!

  #

Momentum is a powerful force -- a force you can tap to get your boat across the finish line sooner.

By Ed Adams

I’ll never forget the day I learned about inertia, because it almost killed me. I was working as a "dock boy" at the yacht club, tossing lines and fending off as boats maneuvered into their slips. One afternoon, a 35-foot sailboat was coming in shorthanded, and a bit too fast. As its skipper ran across the deck grabbing dock lines, he let the boat coast, engine in neutral and helm untended. When it looked like the bow might hit the far corner of the slip, I braced my back against a piling and grabbed the pulpit. You know, the same way Superman would jump in front of a truck and push it to a stop. Hey, I was only 14 years old.

You can probably guess what happened. My arms were no match for the boat’s inertia. It kept on coming until the pulpit locked under my chin, lifted my feet off the ground, and caused nasty crunching sounds as it pinned my neck against the piling. Luckily, the stern line fetched taut; otherwise, I wouldn’t be here to write this.  more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Fifty Years of Frostbite

  #
From Sailing World, February 1997

Fifty years ago, a group of Northwestern University sailors decided to host a little regatta -- a sort of year-ending affair over the long Thanksgiving weekend at Chicago’s Belmont Harbor. Now, if you’ve ever been to Chicago in the winter, you know that the concept of racing sailboats there in late November is more than a little bit crazy. Nevertheless, invitations were accepted by seven other schools in the newly formed Midwest Collegiate Sailing Association (MCSA). The boats, provided by Chicago YC, were 10-foot lapstrake Dyer Dhows, which a crew of two could barely squeeze into. Each team fielded an A and B division crew in the classic collegiate dinghy racing format still in use today. Thus was born the Northwestern Invitational Regatta, which would be renamed as a memorial to the regatta’s primary instigator, Timme Angsten.    more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Build a Fast Electronics System on a Budget

  #

To improve your race results, consider some different ways to stretch your electronics budget.

by Sven Donaldson

Let’s say you have a modest PHRF boat and a schedule that includes 'round-the-buoys and longer day races, plus the occasional overnight event. Let's assume that a VHF radio is already aboard, but that’s all. The more limited the budget, the more difficult the choices, but by taking a common-sense approach it’s quite possible for you to build a useful instrument package that will pay its way in saving seconds on the racecourse.

It’s a good thing that the evolution of marine electronics has mirrored the trend in broad-based consumer electronics: with every passing year, you can buy more for less money. Rapidly advancing technology combined with an ultra-competitive market has created a situation in which consumers can emerge as big winners -- as long as they don’t get lured off course by all the glittering alternatives.

The old saw "garbage in, garbage out" contains a kernel of truth when applied to sailing instrumentation, but for the most part it’s unjustifiably cynical. The reason extreme precision is not essential for many racing applications is simple; most of the time we’re looking for changes, trends and comparative values rather than absolute numbers. "Has the wind built enough to reef again?" or "Did hoisting the staysail under the spinnaker help?" are typical questions that don’t require the ultimate in technology to answer satisfactorily.  more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Think Simple Thoughts

  #
Hold her steady, tiller is balanced...NICE PRESSURE...Trim...TRIM!...If you can't pay attention, we'll get someone ELSE!!!...Now we're feeling fast...Lower and FASTER...boy, that new chute looks fine... There's the mark...we're almost making it on this jibe, and we've got a lane of clear air...Those boats on the other jibe are sailing away from the mark, and they're JIBING...I HEAR YOU...No, we're NOT at two boatlengths yet... All RIGHT! You've got it...Listen to that guy to leeward. He's LOSING it...DAMN it, that's three boats we've lost on this run. Must have been out of phase...One down, two to go, hold it steady...

Does this sound familiar? As complicated as we try to make our sport, success often comes down to avoiding basic mistakes.

by Ed Baird

In my frequent role as a coach, I see a lot of talented sailors doing extraordinary things: straight-leg hiking for hours in Lasers, getting out of crowded mark roundings with strong positions and speed, sniffing out windshifts that shouldn’t have been there. It’s fun to watch how the good guys do it. But it’s also fun to see how they blow it!   more...

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Upwind Trim

  #

Heading For Mackinac - 2000

 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Tom Story Wins Amateur Division at Bitter End YC

  #

Virgin Gorda, BVI, November 4, 2004 – A less-than-stellar first race did nothing to deter Tom Story and crew from racking up three straight bullets, en-route to an overall victory at the 4th Annual Scuttlebutt Sailing Club Championship. After a disappointing first race 5th, the suburban Chicago native got the hang of the Bitter End’s matched fleet of Hunter 216s.

But Story did not go unchallenged. Another Midwesterner, Wisconsinite Mary Jordan pushed hard, winning the final race. Since Story was able to discard his fifth, that left Jordan one point shy. The co-helm team of John Gardner and Jennifer Marks tied with Jordan, but lost the tie-breaker on Jordan’s last race win. Just a single point separated the top three teams.   more...


 



Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Location Lifeline

  #

McMurdo FastFind PLBMurphy’s Law has met its match with McMurdo’s FastFind personal location beacon. Should a major emergency occur and you might have to abandon ship, the FastFind gives off an alert signal by giving doppler location via polar orbiting satellites within 90 minutes of your transmissions, and accuracy is three miles. A 121.5 MHz frequency transmitter gives rescuers something to hone in on. With the FastFind Plus, a built-in GPS receiver gives your coordinates within three minutes and accuracy within 30 meters.   more...

Proceeds from Purchasing this product from this link sends a percentage of the price to H2ONotes to help with production costs.



Amazon  Sailing  Technology  

discussion

  discuss this article

Prev [226]  227  228  229  230  231  232  233  234  235  236  237  238  239  240  241  242  243  244  245  246  247  248  249  250  Next

You are on page 226
A total of 393 pages are available.

Items 3376-3390 of 5889.

Pages: [1 - 25] [26 - 50] [51 - 75] [76 - 100] [101 - 125] [126 - 150] [151 - 175] [176 - 200] [201 - 225] [226 - 250] [251 - 275] [276 - 300] [301 - 325] [326 - 350] [351 - 375] [376 - 393]


<<  |  April 2018  |  >>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293012345
6789101112

view our rss feed



Copyright 2018 Edict Incorporated
280 Mill Street, Suite A | Rochester, MI 48307 | (248) 650-4962
privacy statement | contact us