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community weblog - [ Fishing ]

Good fishing happening on inland lakes

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Mike McKee, Outdoors

Some very good fishing is taking place on the inland lakes, although you wouldn't know by the number of anglers out.

And that's OK with the guys that have been plucking bluegills and crappie from the local waters. Less pressure equals more aggressive fish.

It's a quirk of the angling fraternity to rush the fishing in early spring when water is often too cold and fish are still dormant. Invariably, catches are spotty at best.   more...


 



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Weighting the float could land you more fish

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ERIC SHARP

The recent Indian summer days brought some marvelous live bait angling for sunfish, which can be subtle beyond belief when it comes to how they take the bait.

On a couple of trips to a local lake, I had to scale down the size of the float drastically before seeing bites. Even then, the bobber slid under ever so slowly only after adjusting the weight until it moved if a fish even breathed on the line.

The size of the fish didn't seem to matter. Several times the float crept two inches below the surface, then began moving sideways at a snail's pace. When I tightened the line slowly and set the hook, I was amazed to find a 10-inch bluegill or 12-inch largemouth bass.   more...

 



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The Hook

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he hook had its origins in the gorge, a device used by many primitive cultures, which is frequently found in prehistoric sites. Gorges were made from slivers of bone, flint or turtle-shell which were attached to a line which was knotted through a hole in the centre of the gorge. The fish swallowed the gorge end first in a bait, and the pull of the line levered the gorge across the fish’s throat, trapping it in place. There are many drawbacks to fishing with a gorge; it is hard to conceal, difficult to bait, hard to hook large fish on, and liable to lose its hold while the fish is being played. Despite these problems, in expert hands the gorge can prove highly effective and it is still used in some places today. We do not know for certain when the hook was discovered, although we do know that Neolithic man used hooks, making them out of bone, shell, or thorn depending on which materials were to hand.   more...

 



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Rain freshens salmon run in many northern tributaries

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BY ERIC SHARP
FREE PRESS OUTDOORS WRITER

photo

BALDWIN -- This is the time of year when it would be great to have a cloned twin. Actually, make that quadruplets.

Archery deer season got under way Oct. 1, the duck season will be in full swing statewide as of Saturday, and small game hunting for grouse and squirrels has been good to excellent (it's a little early for rabbits).

So how are we supposed to squeeze in some time for what is turning out to be one of the best salmon runs in a decade on Lake Michigan tributaries from Leland to St. Joseph?   more...

 



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Volunteers help officers keep tabs on snagging

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By JOE BOOMGAARD

DICKSON TWP. — Conservation officers at times don’t have enough eyes or bodies to watch for illicit activities on area streams.

A small, veteran group of volunteers assisted the Michigan DNR last Saturday at Tippy Dam on the Manistee River. The Community Assisting Resource Enforcement (CARE) program, known more commonly by its original moniker, the Manistee County River Watch, helps conservation officers by observing anglers and reporting illegal activity.   more...

 



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Man vs. Catfish: Catching flatheads by hand in Mississippi's Yazoo River

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By Will Brantley

When I was in the sixth grade, there was a know-it-all kid in my class who had a whipping coming all year, until one morning after a little jawing back and forth, I met him halfway across the room and busted his lip. I landed one or two more punches and he caught me in my right eye before the teacher pulled us apart. It was tough to say who the winner was, but nonetheless, I tasted sweet satisfaction. Grabblin’ has a similar outcome. With your forearm laced in bruises and scrapes after you’ve muscled a big, slimy cat from its dark hole to the river’s surface, it’s only fair to call the fight a draw, and yet you walk away grinning like a wild man.   more...

 



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I usually prefer a fly rod....

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Eric Sharp

When fishing for salmon, I usually prefer a fly rod, but on recent trips to the Pere Marquette, Garden and St. Marys rivers, I also took along new casting and spinning rods from Temple Ford Outfitters.

On the PM, I rigged the four-piece, 8-foot-6 TICR2 spinning rod, designed for 8-17-pound line, with a small float, centerpin reel and eight-pound line and fluorocarbon leader, and used it to drift flies through holding lies. It was even more effective than fly-fishing, because I could get drag-free drifts until the float was literally out of sight, and the rod had more than enough backbone to handle big fish that took some distance away.   BY ERIC SHARP

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Salmon-fishing heaven

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BY ERIC SHARP

FREE PRESS OUTDOORS WRITER

SEARCHMONT, Ontario -- Like a lot of family guys, Gus Lucassen hopes to get a little time to himself for fishing during family vacations. So when he came from the Netherlands with his Canadian wife to visit the in-laws, he was eager to try fly-fishing for Great Lakes salmon.

The tall, affable Dutchman from Ugchelen booked two days with guide John Giuliani of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, with modest expectations.   more...

 



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Smelt damage to walleye lakes alarms biologist

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By Kurt Krueger News-Review Editor

The infusion of exotic smelt into several North Woods lakes has destroyed walleye reproduction and demands public attention, said a fisheries expert. Steve Gilbert, a Department of Natural Resources (DNR) fisheries biologist who was recently promoted as Vilas County’s new fish manager, said the devastating rainbow smelt were recently discovered in Long Lake near Phelps. “Shocking surveys show zero walleye reproduction the last three years,” he said. “We believe the smelt are eating all of the young of the year (fingerling) walleyes.” Gilbert said research shows the impacts of smelt on walleyes is most severe in clear, infertile lakes where walleye reproduction is already less than ideal.   more...

 



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Lake St Clair Fly Fishing presentation with Steve Kunnath

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Lake St Clair Fly Fishing presentation at Hanks Fly Shop In Novi on Sept 19th
I will be doing a power point presentation at Hanks Fly Shop in Novi this Tuesday Sept 19th. The presentation will start at 7 pm and I will be there until 9pm to talk about and answer all your questions about Lake St Clair. The presentation will have many slides and information on Lake St Clair, its world class bass, musky, pike and carp fishery and the fly fishing tactics and techniques used to pursue them. If you would like to attend please call Hanks so they can have an accurate idea of how many people to prepare for etc.   more...


http://www.hanksflyfishing.com/
Hanks Flyshop
42535 East Grand River Road
Novi Mi (248) 349-3677


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Fishing Gear 2007: A first look at the best new stuff from the ICAST show

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Photo: Sid Evans

The 2006 ICAST gathering in Las Vegas is the fishing industry's major U.S. trade show, where some 7,000 manufacturers, buyers, and media types paw and claw through thousands of new products that will hit the stores for the 2007 season. Editor-in-Chief Sid Evans and I spent a couple of days last week (7/19 and 7/20) walking the convention-center floor, finding tackle and gear that's wild or wacky or wonderful—even some things that will be genuinely useful. Note that while I've provided manufacturer's web links, it may be several months before these products are actually listed or available. Here are a few highlights. --John Merwin    more...

 



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Endangered sturgeon return

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 TOLEDO – Frank McDonald felt the tug on his fishing line and knew he had something big. “I was hoping it was a gigantic walleye,” he said.

It was much bigger.

McDonald hooked a 3-foot-long sturgeon, a prehistoric fish that was thought to be all but gone from Lake Erie less than a decade ago. He hauled it into the boat just long enough to snap a few pictures before releasing it.

Sturgeon – prized for its caviar and smoked meat – are slowly starting to make a comeback in areas where water quality has improved. The fish, which are protected in just about every state where they’re found, were overfished and nearly disappeared in the early 1900s despite being so abundant on Lake Erie that they were burned for fuel in steamships.   more...

 



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How the Spook got its name

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By ERIC SHARP
Detroit Free Press

DOWAGIAC, Mich. — Almost every serious angler knows about the Heddon Zara Spook, one of the top-10 artificial lures of all time and still a standby after 80 years. But did you ever wonder how it got its name?

The original wood version, the Zaragossa, was made in the 1920s for fishing in Florida. After watching a prototype lure zigzag across the water in a test tank, a Heddon worker remarked that it wiggled its butt just like the hookers on Zaragoza Street in Panama City.

The misspelled name stuck, and when the plastic version came out a few years later, workers dubbed it the Spook because they thought it looked ghostly when light shone through its translucent body.   more...

 



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FIVE THINGS: About the state fish

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BY JOHN SCHMITTROTH

FREE PRESS SPECIAL WRITER

Before Michigan's general trout season ends Sept. 30, let's take a close look at the brook trout.

WHAT'S IN A NAME

The brook trout is sometimes called Michigan's only native trout, because rainbow trout and brown trout are both imports (from the American West and Germany, respectively).

However, scientifically, the brook trout is a member of the char family. So is the closely related lake trout.

The brook trout is also called a brookie, squaretail, speckled trout, spec and, if relocating to a lake, coaster.   more...

 



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Cool fall waters bring fish near the shore -- and maybe to your line

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photoBY ERIC SHARP

FREE PRESS OUTDOORS WRITER

"Happy, happy! Joy, joy!" Yes, Stimpy, the Fall Fishing Fairy has waved her magic wand over the cooling waters and brought big, fat sunfish back into the shallows where we can have a blast with a 3-weight fly rod or ultralight spinning tackle.

Not that it's always easy. I stood on the shore one recent evening near Chuck and Sheryl Naismith of Fort Wayne, Ind., who were camping on the way home from the Upper Peninsula. In two hours the previous day, in conditions that seemed identical, we each caught more than 20 bluegills, pumpkinseeds and small bass -- me on a No. 18 black gnat dry fly and them on worms under a bobber. more...

 



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